Tapping America's Potential Our Goal: Increase the annual number of U.S. science, technology, engineering and mathematics bachelor's-level graduates to 400,000 degrees by 2015.
Home About Us Resources Forum Advocacy News Contact Us
Stay TAPped InTAP RSS FeedsFacebookTwitter
Are We Falling Behind
Advocacy

News Coverage Archive
Sort by Newest Date | Sort by Title | Sort by Source

The momentum for improving U.S. STEM capabilities is building, with opinion leaders and editorial boards opining in support of reform and newsrooms writing about it across the country.

July 18, 2017 — Forbes  — “The Companies With The Most STEM Job Openings Right Now”
It's no secret that technical jobs pay well and are in high demand in America, and it's easy to assume most of those roles sit in Silicon Valley. But today, organizations need people with skills in science, technology, engineering and math across a wide variety of industries and geographies. Forbes worked with careers site Indeed to find the companies hiring the most STEM jobs right now.

July 12, 2017 — Phys.org  — “To attract more students to STEM, highlight communal aspects of STEM careers”
The idea of scientists working long hours in lab by themselves is a common concept for Americans, but this idea of a “lone scientist” is not universal. Examining students in the United States, India, and China, social psychologists show not only a cultural divide in how STEM careers are viewed, but that these views can be changed to encourage more interest in STEM fields. … “By incorporating communal activities into STEM, we can help to change stereotypes about STEM and attract many of those individuals with high STEM ability,” says Brown. ”Additionally, incorporating communion into STEM is a fairly inexpensive way to increase the size of the STEM workforce.”

July 07, 2017 — Education Dive  — “Keep an eye on these 7 notable ed tech tools from ISTE 2017”
With over 21,000 attendees and exhibitors packing San Antonio's Henry B. Gonzalez Convention Center, this year's International Society for Technology in Education (ISTE) Conference was massive. (It's an assertion backed up by the number of sessions we saw that were so popular they had queue lines in case anyone left.) As you might expect, a conference with turnout that high could only have a showfloor to match. If you weren't able to make it, or simply didn't have time to see everything, we've highlighted a few of our favorites — from digital textbooks and eMentoring services to game-based learning platforms and robots.

June 27, 2017 — Education World  — “Research: Forget Archery, These STEM-Focused Campers Are All About Robotics and Chemistry”
Some campers this summer are skipping on traditional summer camp activities like canoeing to try their hand at something a little more futuristic -- like, fighting robots for example. … The camps focused on STEM (science, technology, engineering and mathematics) have students working on everything [from] building solar ovens to roast s’mores to using forensics to search for clues in mock crime scenes. It’s a way for educators to connect with students who have a passion for science and math in a no-pressure environment. … STEM-focused camps are not only a way to keep kids learning throughout the summer, but an opportunity to fuel their interest in the subject and help steer them towards a promising career path.

June 20, 2017 — THE Journal  — “Research: Boys Say They're More Likely to Pursue STEM Careers Than Girls”
Teenage boys say they are more likely to pursue STEM careers than girls, according to research recently published by nonprofit Junior Achievement and professional services firm EY (formerly Ernst & Young). More than one-third (36 percent) of boys surveyed said they would pursue STEM careers in the future, versus only 11 percent of girls. ... On behalf of Junior Achievement and EY, market research firm ORC International surveyed 1,000 13-17-year-olds between Feb. 28 and March 5, 2017. Of those surveyed, an impressive 91 percent of boys and girls said they know what kind of job they want after they graduate from high school.

June 06, 2017 — The Christian Science Monitor  — “Can female mentors patch the leaky STEM pipeline?”
As a freshman, Stephanie Mula found the University of Massachusetts's engineering program "overwhelming.” … Nevertheless, she went on to beat the odds of the famously leaky science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) pipeline that produces only three professionals for every 100 female students who begin studies in the field. … She credits her success in part to the academic and professional advice of her upperclassmen mentor, a participant in a UMASS Amherst pilot program that's revealing significant benefits for same-gender peer mentoring. … An astonishing 100 percent of female engineering students in the study mentored by advanced female students continued on to their second year, a transition point that often sees many choose a different path. Researchers concluded successful female role models made the difference, stemming the decline in self-confidence seen among those with male mentors or no mentor at all. The results, published April in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, suggest identity may play a role in effective mentoring, which could inform programs targeting other underrepresented groups.

May 30, 2017 — Education Dive  — “Armed Forces see STEM education as ensuring a bright future”
Employers in fields that utilize science, technology, engineering and mathematics have consistently sounded a warning bell about the future of STEM in the United States, cautioning that there is a coming gap in qualified applicants for employers. The rates of STEM graduates are not keeping up with the amount of job openings in related fields, and the issue could worsen, as the U.S. will add about one million new STEM jobs by 2020. … Further research in 2015 indicated that the gaps are even more pronounced between genders and ethnicities, and while STEM jobs and degrees have steadily increased since 2000, the STEM workforce was no more diverse than it was 14 years prior. The U.S. Armed Forces, including the Army Educational Outreach Program (AEOP), have responded to the gap by leveraging their civilian scientists, engineers and laboratories. The branches host learning sessions and competitions and promote mentorships between students and employees with jobs pertaining to STEM throughout the country.

May 27, 2017 — U.S. News & World Report  — “Community Colleges Filling STEM Pipeline”
Community colleges are playing an increasingly important role in providing students the science, technology, engineering and math, or STEM, skills they need for the thousands of jobs employers are having a hard time filling. … But as companies are beginning to require more technological know-how even from their entry-level employees, community colleges are increasingly focusing on helping students who aren't planning to get four-year degrees, and instead are looking for two-year and other certificates programs. "As we look at the growth in jobs, a lot of the jobs will not require a college degree, but they will require a STEM education," said Debra Reed, chairman, president and CEO of Sempra Energy.

May 25, 2017 — U.S. News & World Report  — “Low-Income Students Nowhere to Be Found in STEM”
While much of the focus on underrepresented students in science, technology, engineering and math, or STEM, is placed on women and students of color, the dearth of low-income students has Moore [dean of Carnegie Mellon University's School of Computer Science] and his colleagues at Carnegie Mellon "terrified," he says. … "If you look at where we admit students who are going to have the most amazing careers you can imagine, you can pretty much map that against a map of the suburbs of regions of the United States which are rich enough to have strong math and computer science programs," Moore said. He continued: "This is very, very serious. We are genuinely worried that we are responsible for being part of an ongoing hegemony of the rich, wealthy – those being able to afford to live in the places where they can teach their kids to do that.” Moore says Carnegie has not homed in on the answer, but is considering ways to provide a more "gentle" introduction to students who lack a robust STEM background because their schools don't offer rigorous math and science courses.

April 26, 2017 — GeekWire  — “By age 6, kids already think boys are better than girls in programming and robotics”
There’s a lot of effort to attract women to the computer sciences at universities and the workforce. But to shift technology’s gender imbalance we might need to focus on a younger crowd. Much younger — like 6-year-olds. For the first time, research from the University of Washington shows that by first grade, children are already embracing the stereotype that boys are better than girls at robotics and programming … But there is some good news. If you give a girl a robot and some simple tools for programming it, her feelings about computer sciences will be more positive.

Page 1 of 112

    

Use the links below to read more news about TAP and related policy issues:

top