Tapping America's Potential Our Goal: Increase the annual number of U.S. science, technology, engineering and mathematics bachelor's-level graduates to 400,000 degrees by 2015.
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The momentum for improving U.S. STEM capabilities is building, with opinion leaders and editorial boards opining in support of reform and newsrooms writing about it across the country.

Read these opinions, the latest news coverage and news from TAP in this section.


Editorial and Op-ed Support

November 17, 2016 — U.S. News & World Report (Opinion) — “To Close Gap in STEM Pipeline, Engage Families”
The U.S. Department of Commerce reports that science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) jobs will grow 17 percent by 2018. And the growth in STEM jobs will be 55 percent faster than non-STEM jobs over the next 10 years. Although such anticipated growth is encouraging since it supports the theory that a thriving STEM workforce is directly linked to the economic prosperity of the United States, there is still concern: as many as 2.4 million STEM jobs could remain unfilled in the nation by that time. Is there a solution to help drive our nation's youth into these fast-growing STEM fields and meet the demand for qualified STEM professionals? According to a new report issued by National PTA, families are the answer.

November 16, 2016 — Fortune (Opinion) — “How American Manufacturers Are Working to Close the 'Skills Gap’”
American manufacturers are leading an innovation revolution, transforming the products we make and how we make them. Boasting the globe’s most productive workforce, abundant energy and unparalleled technical capabilities, our country is poised to advance the promise of manufacturing in America. Companies are creating jobs in the United States, and foreign enterprises are investing at record levels. The manufacturing economy is $2 trillion strong and supports about one in six American jobs. The entire world wants the products of manufacturing in the United States, from internet-connected electronics to lifesaving pharmaceuticals. The only missing piece—the next generation of skilled workers who will take up the mantle of manufacturing and transform the future.

September 16, 2016 — Wall Street Journal (Opinion) — “STEM Literacy and Jobs”
… [S]tudents don’t often appreciate the difference between achieving a modicum of STEM literacy and pursuing a STEM profession. Many avoid taking STEM courses because they have no intention of majoring in a STEM discipline. While everyone agrees that basic literacy is critical for just about any job, we don’t quite have the same level of appreciation that being STEM literate is increasingly important to qualify for a wide variety of jobs in our information-based knowledge economy.

April 12, 2016 — The Journal (Opinion) — “Army Offers STEM Teachers a Summer Research Experience”
A new program associated with the United States Army is preparing a summer program to help teachers of science, technology, engineering and math (STEM). Applications are being accepted through April 22 for the Research Experiences for STEM Educators and Teachers (RESET) program planned by the Army Educational Outreach Program (AEOP).

March 02, 2016 — New York Times (Editorial), (Opinion) — “Student Question | Do We Need a Better Way to Teach Math?”
Do you ever wonder if there is a better way to teach math? Andrew Hacker, who teaches political science and mathematics at Queens College, definitely has: Here’s an apparent paradox: Most Americans have taken high school mathematics, including geometry and algebra, yet a national survey found that 82 percent of adults could not compute the cost of a carpet when told its dimensions and square-yard price. The Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development recently tested adults in 24 countries on basic “numeracy” skills. Typical questions involved odometer readings and produce sell-by tags. The United States ended an embarrassing 22nd, behind Estonia and Cyprus. We should be doing better. Is more mathematics the answer?

Editorial and Op-ed Support Archive

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News Coverage

February 22, 2017 — Forbes — “Women Who Code: You Are Not Alone”
With the upcoming Academy Awards, best picture nominee Hidden Figures is receiving more coverage than ever. Women in STEM was already a national conversation, but the film helped propel the topic into the forefront of many conversations. The tech industry has gained a reputation for being a “boys club” -- statistically, women in the field either lose interest over time or get discouraged somewhere in the school or career pipeline. As more of our students went to see Hidden Figures, they asked us many good questions about the current state of women in STEM. We decided to reach out to Women Who Code, whose CEO, Alaina Percival, provided some enlightening and informative responses to our questions.

February 22, 2017 — NPR — “After Making History In Space, Mae Jemison Works To Prime Future Scientists”
Mae Jemison made history in this field as the first African-American woman in space, as part of the crew on Space Shuttle Endeavour in 1992. Jemison tells NPR's Ari Shapiro she welcomes this new interest in women and minorities who broke boundaries in space because those people were previously excluded from the narrative. “Well, I think it's one of those things that really needs to be done,” Jemison says. “And this is because people of all types have made contributions across the spectrum of the sciences, across the spectrum of space exploration, and they have been left out many times, purposefully.”

February 03, 2017 — CBS News — “Think big, start early: New effort to close gender gap in science starts in preschool”
After a brief stint in early childhood education, [Phaedra] Brown founded the Hope Institute of Science for Girls in the Mount Airy neighborhood of Philadelphia. It’s a “brick and mortar” solution to engaging preschool girls in science, technology, engineering and math topics — commonly known as STEM — at the very beginning of their educational journeys, she said … Despite its imposing name, the Hope Institute of Science for Girls is small and focused, with only nine students total, ages 1 to 4. There, Brown’s lessons are designed to expose toddler girls to STEM in subtle, age-appropriate ways … By starting young, the Hope Institute might be on to something significant.

January 24, 2017 — USA Today — “The best of the best U.S. jobs are tech, tech and tech, again”
Hey kids, want to grow up to land the best job in the country? Then keep poring over those math and science textbooks. Jobs that require a range of STEM skills (science, technology, engineering and math) claimed 14 spots in Glassdoor's new "50 Best Jobs in America" survey, out Monday … The proliferation of technology-related jobs is due to those skills now being needed at businesses that don't consider themselves traditional tech companies, says Andrew Chamberlain, chief economist at Glassdoor … These days, almost every company is in some way a tech company, requiring workers who are able to create and maintain a firm's technological infrastructure.

January 18, 2017 — Phys.org — “Talking to children about STEM fields boosts test scores and career interest”
A new study finds parents who talk with their high schoolers about the relevance of science and math can increase competency and career interest in the fields. The findings, published Jan. 17 in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, show a 12 percentage point increase on the math and science ACT for students whose parents were provided with information on how to effectively convey the importance of science, technology, engineering and math. The same students also are likely to be more interested in pursuing STEM careers, including taking STEM classes in college and having a favorable impression of the fields.

News Coverage Archive

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TAP News

May 22, 2013 ITIF Tells the 'Real Story' of America's STEM Workforce
May 06, 2013 High Starting Salaries for STEM Majors Indicate Too Few Graduates to Meet Demand in These Fields
April 26, 2013 'Power and Potential' of STEM on Display at White House Science Fair
August 03, 2012 ‘National Research Universities Are Our Secret Weapons,’ Says Accenture Executive Chairman

TAP News Archive

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