Tapping America's Potential Our Goal: Increase the annual number of U.S. science, technology, engineering and mathematics bachelor's-level graduates to 400,000 degrees by 2015.
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The momentum for improving U.S. STEM capabilities is building, with opinion leaders and editorial boards opining in support of reform and newsrooms writing about it across the country.

Read these opinions, the latest news coverage and news from TAP in this section.


Editorial and Op-ed Support

August 17, 2017 — U.S. News & World Report (Opinion) — “Op-Ed: Is the Investment in STEM Education Paying Off?”
For more than two decades there has been a hefty investment in science, technology, engineering and mathematics education in the United States. There is no question that this investment has, at the very least, brought the positives derived from better STEM education practices into the national conversation. The goal of STEM education is to prepare a generation of citizens capable of making evidence-based decisions required for the innovative fields that are driving the 21st-century economy. And to that end, the U.S.'s investment is working. However, this commitment will need to continue in order to ensure accessibility to a quality STEM education for all students if the U.S. is to remain globally competitive over the long term.

May 10, 2017 — U.S. News & World Report (Opinion) — “Students Shouldn't Live in STEM Deserts”
More than ever, a high-quality math and science education is the foundation for opportunity … Yet, we as a nation continue with a familiar pattern in which access to high-quality STEM learning is unevenly distributed. Millions of students across the country live in what we call STEM deserts – school communities without access to rigorous and engaging math and science courses. Lack of STEM access is a critical equity issue in education, particularly for students in urban and rural communities, where access to high-level math and science courses is often out of reach. Soon, the impact of students living in STEM deserts will not only be reflected in those students’ high school and college competition rates, but will also take a toll on the country’s technological superiority, its economy and national security.

May 03, 2017 — HuffPost (Opinion) — “Cinco de Mayo: A Major Milestone for Computer Science Education”
Friday, May 5th, as many Americans are celebrating the Mexican holiday with food, drink and friends, an estimated 51K high school students will be sitting down to take the first ever Advanced Placement Computer Science Principles (AP-CSP) exam …The AP-CSP course and exam are the result of nearly ten years of dogged work by hundreds of education advocates, researchers, and high school teachers … The course focuses on computational thinking and problem solving, use of computational tools to analyze and study data, societal implications of computing such as security and privacy, and is unique in its focus on fostering students creativity by using computing to address issues relevant to their lives.

November 17, 2016 — U.S. News & World Report (Opinion) — “To Close Gap in STEM Pipeline, Engage Families”
The U.S. Department of Commerce reports that science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) jobs will grow 17 percent by 2018. And the growth in STEM jobs will be 55 percent faster than non-STEM jobs over the next 10 years. Although such anticipated growth is encouraging since it supports the theory that a thriving STEM workforce is directly linked to the economic prosperity of the United States, there is still concern: as many as 2.4 million STEM jobs could remain unfilled in the nation by that time. Is there a solution to help drive our nation's youth into these fast-growing STEM fields and meet the demand for qualified STEM professionals? According to a new report issued by National PTA, families are the answer.

November 16, 2016 — Fortune (Opinion) — “How American Manufacturers Are Working to Close the 'Skills Gap’”
American manufacturers are leading an innovation revolution, transforming the products we make and how we make them. Boasting the globe’s most productive workforce, abundant energy and unparalleled technical capabilities, our country is poised to advance the promise of manufacturing in America. Companies are creating jobs in the United States, and foreign enterprises are investing at record levels. The manufacturing economy is $2 trillion strong and supports about one in six American jobs. The entire world wants the products of manufacturing in the United States, from internet-connected electronics to lifesaving pharmaceuticals. The only missing piece—the next generation of skilled workers who will take up the mantle of manufacturing and transform the future.

Editorial and Op-ed Support Archive

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News Coverage

August 02, 2017 — Education Dive — “Educators using music to make connections to STEM”
... [A] growing multitude of organizations and advocates are promoting the use of music in the course of STEM education. Educators have increasingly called for music to be incorporated into STEM in recent years, though progress has proceeded in fits and starts.

July 31, 2017 — NPR — “Tens Of Thousands More Women And Minorities Are Taking Computer Science”
U.S. high schools got a high-tech update this past school year. Not by federal fiat or by state law, but largely at the hand of independent nonprofits … The College Board last fall introduced a new course and exam called AP Computer Science Principles. Eight years in the planning, it was the largest such course launch in history. While the existing AP Computer Science course focuses on the Java programming language, the new course is billed as a creative exploration of real-world problems. It's designed to appeal to people who might have assumed that computers were not for them. And in that sense, it's working.

July 25, 2017 — Associated Press — “Robots, race cars and weather: Girl Scouts offer new badges”
Girl Scouts from tiny Daisies to teen Ambassadors may earn 23 new badges focused on science, technology, engineering and math. It’s the largest addition of new badges in a decade for Girl Scouts of the USA. The effort takes a progressive approach to STEM and also nudges girls to become citizen scientists using the great outdoors as their laboratory. Among the new badges are those that introduce kindergarten and first graders to the world of robots and engineering. Scouts can learn basic programming and build prototypes to solve everyday problems. Older scouts will have the chance to enhance those skills, learning more about artificial intelligence, algorithms and how to formally present their work.

July 24, 2017 — U.S. News & World Report — “3 STEM Insights for U.S. Teens From International Students”
A robotics competition brought together high schoolers from more than 150 counties to Washington last week. The event, organized by nonprofit FIRST Global, aimed to bring young students together to develop their STEM – science, technology, engineering and math – skills, while also teaching them how to solve worldwide problems together. … Students and their adult mentors from all over the world at the event shared with U.S. News their thoughts on the keys to success in math and science.

July 18, 2017 — Forbes — “The Companies With The Most STEM Job Openings Right Now”
It's no secret that technical jobs pay well and are in high demand in America, and it's easy to assume most of those roles sit in Silicon Valley. But today, organizations need people with skills in science, technology, engineering and math across a wide variety of industries and geographies. Forbes worked with careers site Indeed to find the companies hiring the most STEM jobs right now.

News Coverage Archive

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TAP News

May 22, 2013 ITIF Tells the 'Real Story' of America's STEM Workforce
May 06, 2013 High Starting Salaries for STEM Majors Indicate Too Few Graduates to Meet Demand in These Fields
April 26, 2013 'Power and Potential' of STEM on Display at White House Science Fair
August 03, 2012 ‘National Research Universities Are Our Secret Weapons,’ Says Accenture Executive Chairman

TAP News Archive

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